VA Report: Dysphagia in the setting of myocardial infarction

Examples for extrinsic esophageal compression are found in inflammatory, postoperative and neoplastic mediastinal diseases, but also in substernal strumae, cervical spondylitis and vertebral osteophytes. Vascular esophageal compression syndromes are typically caused by an aberrant origin of the right subclavian artery far left in the aortic branch and course of this “A. lusoria” anterior or posterior of the esophagus. In addition, similar forms of esophageal compression can result from a congenital right-sided aorta, aortic aneurysms and conditions of left atrial enlargement.

Werner, C., Rbah, R., & Böhm, M. (n.d.). Cardiovascular dysphagia. Clinical Research in Cardiology : Official Journal of the German Cardiac Society., 95(1), 54-56.

Radiological imaging revealed an extrinsic esophageal compression as the cause of the patient’s complaints, for example, due to a mediastinal tumor. However, computed tomography of the chest showed a rare case of cardiovascular compression as the cause of dysphagia in this case. The patient turned down the option of endoscopic examination at the time.

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